About your Search

20130117
20130125
STATION
CSPAN2 6
KQED (PBS) 5
KCSM (PBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
LINKTV 2
CNN 1
CNNW 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
WETA 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 21
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
violence from spilling over. >> late last year, turkey asked nato for a missile defense system. the pieces of that system came off of the boat from germany. >> the military equipment is now in turkey and not far from the border in syria and the organization insists that the hardware stays in this country. nato says that they are not crossing the border to get directly involved in the conflict in syria. -- >> germany and the u.s. have agreed to send patriot missiles to germany. -- >> our mission is to protect the town, are ranged between nato and the turkish allies, so i don't see any involvement in any offensive action, that is not what we're here for. >> turkey insists that they can handle the rest of their defense. the war is just on the other side of the fence. the patriots will stop missiles, but they won't stop the more immediate threat of the stray bullets, but still, turkey wants the hardware. they are taking every measure to keep the country save. the patriots are expected to be operational by the start of next month. -- >> thousands of musicians marched down pennsylvania avenue as
. >> tensions are running high in some parts of turkey as nato gears up to get its missile defense system up and running this weekend. turkey has requested help because of concerns that the syrian civil war could spill over to its borders. the missiles have been sent by the united states, germany, and the netherlands, but not everyone approves of the move. on tuesday, a proud of -- a crowd of protesters. >> demonstrations against the patriot missile deployment have been taking place for days. the confrontation and threats against german soldiers reportedly arose from a protest like this one on monday. the five germans strolling through town in civilian clothing may have been mistaken for americans. turkish security forces managed to bring the germans to safety. the german government has called it a serious incident. >> this is unacceptable. against the backdrop of this incident, it will be necessary to speak closely with the turkish authorities about the threat posed to german soldiers. we expect our host country, turkey, to inspect the security of our soldiers when they move around in the c
expect from their nato ally. the need to say the european nations can't pay ransom money to terrorist groups because that simply fuels them to buy arms and soldiers. >> michael: but is nato looking to the united states richard to be the nation that says okay you guys listen up what happened with germany and france they paid these ransoms and got these 18 people out, and now they have funded these groups? why is it incumbent upon the united states then to be -- you know -- [ overlapping speakers ] >> the united states pays more than two-thirds of the nato budget so we have a lion's share of influence. the money paid to save the germans and french backpackers, that trend has continued. now we have encouraged -- our allies have encouraged this industry by rewarding it with money, and instead of reacting -- using other means. >> michael: of course it is going to continue if it has worked. i want to ask you as someone who has a degree of expertise in this, where do you see this going now? and what would america's role be? on the ground, with drones? what is your tak
to fight rebels in mali. eu foreign ministers in brussels for talks there. nato approved a mission to send 200 military trainers to help mali's forces. >> and they are considering other ways to help the government. the first troops from the african-led mission are due to arrive today. >> for more, we are joined by our brussels correspondent. the eu has agreed to send military personnel. do we have any idea what this mission will look like? >> it is important to stress first of all that the idea is not new. back in december, they agreed they saw the situation and said they would send down a couple of hundred instructors -- of around 200 instructors -- to train the army, and now, of course, in light of recent developments, this mission will be sped up, which means 200 instructors or 250 will be sent down. they will instruct the army in terms of basic military training, but also in the field of international and humanitarian law and how to protect civilians. there are not many details yet in the number -- and the number of people deployed to the ground could rise again. all we know is that th
of the speeches you've made recently i've been going over them, you talk a lot about nato and the fact that the experience in afghanistan is not -- >> it's not over yet. >> it hasn't been a terrifically happy one for nato and that that might sort of lead to a process in which we just don't have the will anymore or the intention to stay on the same scale we've been before particularly given the perception that our partners are not pulling their weight. how do you think we are going to be able to keep nato going? what would it take, in your view, to sustain nato and keep it relevant given our budgetary restrictions? >> well, i think an intervening event that poses a threat, um, we saw a little resurgence of nato in the libya situation where clearly the united states was not going to take the lead, was going to supply reconnaissance, intelligence, surveillance and a little bit of back up. but it was either nato getting together and going forward or not. that was the threat of, you know, the threat of a destabilized libya, the immigration consequences of that for southern europe, the histo
and algeria. the united states and greece have been nato allies for sixty years. greece's defense expenditures will likely drastically reduced because of the crisis you've been describing here. how do you see them contributing to the international security in the years ahead? thank you. >>if i understand you correctly how greece can contribute to europe. for a stability for -- for most stability. greece is a country that finds itself or that borders countries that are in a state of flux. it is a country that the european union and nato from our perspective is that greece needs to be bridge of friendship and stability in the area. of course, greece cannot face and solve a series of issues all alone. as you mentioned earlier, which have other causes, the irrespective to greece and that harm stability not only in the region but the on worldwide scale. greece could help and contribute within the framework of the organizations to which it belongs. in order for -- in order to believe the crisis in the areas, a major issue that is of concern to us in recent times what is going to happen in -- enablin
to become supreme commander of nato forces in europe. white house officials said today his nomination is no longer on hold. that's after the pentagon inspector general cleared allen of any wrongdoing in e-mail exchanges with a tampa, florida woman. allen steps down as overall coalition commander in afghanistan next month. the air force's top general vowed today to put an end to sexual misconduct within the service. figures for 2012 show some 800 reported incidents. many of the cases stemmed from a scandal at lackland air force base near san antonio. an investigation there found 32 instructors allegedly engaged in sexual misconduct with nearly 60 female service members. at a house hearing, the air force chief of staff general mark welsh called the numbers appalling. >> there is no way we can allow this to happen again. the air force goal for sexual assault is not simply to lower the number. the goal is zero. it's the only acceptable objective. the impact on every victim, their family, their friends, the other people in their unit is heartwrenching. and attacking this cancer is a full-t
they should. >> why is nato still transferring the prisoners? >> to a certain extent, they have to under the agreements we made with the afghan government to begin drawing down our forces and begin turning over operations to them. the afghan government has demanded this. we have slowed it down more than we can technically under the agreements we have made with them. >> stuck the u.s. government care about this? >> we do care about it. we have resisted some of the requests of the cars i government. they have slowed down the transfer they agreed to. they are aware of these things. they are trying to transfer them to presence which have a better record than some of these places where they have done horrible things the u.n. documents. >> how concerned are you the government has rejected this report? it could turn around and say, you do not have a very clean copy. the torture exists within your band? >> i think the fact they are rejecting it will hurt them in the long term. what they will do is feed into the narrative of those who are opposed to the afghan government, like the taliban, and sa
nato and the u.s. umbrella over nato and the u.s. taking money into nato. there are some in the fighting moments coming read this have to the future of nato and the transatlantic relationship in dealing with this range of issues going all across the south of europe that has a direct effect on them. there's a day of reckoning. i wish i could be more optimistic on it. we all see what the fiscal constraints are in the austerity being proposed. they are going to have to come to the point with some tough decisions to make because the u.s. is not going to be there at the level land presence and protection that they are used to and have relied on in the past. >> mr. mcfarland. >> our budget legacy -- nice to see you. >> thank you for coming. more than 30 years of service. the energy and natural resources committee, we are continuing to san $400 billion a year overseas to buy oil. your colleague senator lugar for a long time told us the only way to beat a cartel, sponsored open fuel standard, basically make a competitive market, the move, automobiles, trucks, weather is electrici
's nomination as commander of nato forces in europe. the pentagon investigated general allen for sending potentially inappropriate e- mails to a florida woman linked to the david petraeus scandal, but yesterday allen was cleared of wrongdoing. the battle over the debt ceiling has been put off to another day because on this day the republican-controlled house voted 285-114 to allow the government to keep borrowing the money it needs to pay its bills through mid-may. the senate and the white house are expected to go along avoiding the threat of default that would rattle financial markets. in a survey of investors by bloomberg, 36% said america's fiscal woes are the biggest threat to the world economy, more than the 29% who named the european debt crisis. anthony mason is attending a meeting of world bankers in davos, switzerland. >> reporter: how strong do you think the u.s. economy actually is right now? >> i think the u.s. economy wants to be strong. >> reporter: but mary callahan erdoes says the bickering in washington is holding it back. erdos is one of the most powerful women on wall
as a nato treaty with western europe, defend ourselves, and international treaty. there's plenty of trade treaties. same thing. i am criticizing the book supranational or transnational, think of the transcontinental railway, something across nation. so the term transnational is used and that's distinguished from international. those are some of the ideas you could stick in the refit little now. what are global or transnational lives? what are global laws and rules mean? where are the twin pillars? liberty consent. i'll give you one example of national security policy in one example from domestic policy. let's look at the laws of war. united states is a party to the geneva conventions of 1949. the original geneva conventions at the traditional laws of war were radically altered in 1977 by the addition of additional protocol one to the geneva conventions. protocol one was supported during negotiations by the group of 77, soviet bloc at the time, the speeds, the swiss, many human rights groups, many ngos, nongovernmental organizations including international committee of the red cross. proto
and we should pay tribute to all those in the european union, alongside nato, who made that happen. but today them overriding, the main purpose of the european union is different. not to in piece, but to secure prosperity. the challenges come not from within this continent but from outside. from the surging economies in the east and the south. now, of course, a growing world economy benefits us all, but we should be in no doubt that a new global race of nations is underway today. a race for the wealth and for the jobs of the future. the map of global influence is changing before our eyes. and these changes are already being felt by the entrepreneur in the netherlands, the worker in germany, the family in britain. so i want to speak to you today with urgency and frankness about the european union and how it does change, both to deliver prosperity and to retain the support of its peoples. but first, i want to set out the spirit in which i approach these issues. i know that the united kingdom is sometimes seen as an argumentative and rather strong-minded member of the family of europe
. >> suarez: you've got a nato partner in france fighting against a guerrilla army in mali. it's not an easy task, is it? >> not at all. from a logistical standpoint i thought the itn reporter was spot on when she talked about the logistical issues that are inherent in any kind of war, but they are particularly in hernt in one where the climate is difficult, where the terrain is almost impossible and where you're really not used to configureing your forces in a way that allows you to move rapidly in this kind of terrain. it's very much adown the american southwest and it is a very, very difficult area not only from the standpoint of things like temperature and mountains and things of that nature, it's the nature of the terrain that makes it very difficult to move from one point to another. >> suarez: we've been covering the fight in mali over the last several days but algeria hasn't been in the news for a long time. what's the state of play there? who's running the place? >> there's a government in algeria, it's one that probably we would describe as formerly a republic but an authoritarian
with an "outfront" investigation. >> reporter: the land nato liberated from moammar gadhafi is now home to multiple training camps for potential terrorists. >> militants sympathetic to al qaeda have established quasi safe havens in several parts of lib ra. >> reporter: benghazi where americans were targeted and four killed is just one of the strongholds. but the camps are spread throughout the country. libyan officials tell cnn terrorist analyst paul cruikshank. >> amongst their numbers are people with direct connections to al qaeda central. >> reporter: at least three training camps near the december cert in the algerian border, 30 miles from the gas complex that's under siege. a u.s. official tells cnn the militants who seized american hostages likely crossed that border to carry out their attack. >> libya is a lesson in what the international community can achieve. >> reporter: president bowl called the limited operation anybody la a recipe for the future. >> not a single u.s. troop was on the ground. >> reporter: but that light footprint left room for others to step in. zawahiri dispatched a to
've got a nato partner in france fighting against a guerrilla army in mali. it's not an easy task is it? >> not at all. from a logistical standpoint i thought the itn reporter was spot on when she talked about the logistical issues that are inherent in any kind of war but they are particularly in hernt in one where the climate is difficult, where the terrain is almost impossible and where you're really not used to configureing your forces in a way that allows you to move rapidly in this kind of terrain. it's very much adown the american southwest and it is a very, very difficult area not only from the standpoint of things like temperature and mountains and things of that nature, it's the nature of the terrain that makes it very difficult to move from one point to another. >> suarez: we've been covering the fight in mali over the last several days but algeria hasn't been in the news for a long time. what's the state of play there? who's running the place? >> there's a government in algeria it's one that probably we would describe as formerly a republic but an authoritarian state. certain
alongside nato who made that happen. but today the overriding and main practice of the european union is different. not to win peace, but to secure prosperity. challenges come not from within this continent, but from outside it. from a surging economy of the east and the south. a growing world economy benefits us all. we should be in no doubt that a new global rates of nations is underway today. a race for the wealth and for the jobs of the future. .. and the industrial revolution to nonfans to write european history in europe has helped to radars. has made a contribution to europe. we have provided a haven to those fleeing tyranny in persecution. we keep the flame of liberty alive. across the continent, and silent cemeteries played hundreds of thousands of british servicemen who gave their lives for europe's freedom we paid our parts for the iron curtain and champ named into the e.u. of those countries that lost so many figures to communists. contained in this history is a crucial point about britain, our natural character, our attitude to europe. britain is characterized, but above
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)